‘USA 1776’ DMR Talk Group

DMR-logoOne of the nice things of D-Star and DMR is the ability to talk all over the world without the need of an HF rig and a bunch of big antennas. While this largely reduces a radio to a simple Internet-driven communication tool – just like Skype or other VoIP apps – it’s definitely nice to use.

There are a few problems surrounding DMR, one of which is the lack of more than two time slots. For example, if hams are using the Dutch Hytera network and occupying talk group 204 on slot 1, World Wide (which uses the same time slot) will be unavailable. Because 204-1 is a busy place, world wide QSOs are often impossible. It’s one of the reasons I thought of dumping DMR all together — I can talk to the same Dutch guys on analog while enjoying a much better quality audio.

There are reasons to keep DMR too. DMR is maturing; there are more than enough possibilities to put less pressure on the nation-wide network by going local. Now if only hams would do that…. but most don’t. Another reason to keep DMR for now is the gateway we recently added, which connects D-Star to our DMR network.

Not available on the Motorola network, sorry — some people responsible for that network appear to be so scared of such innovations that they will ban a repeater from the network if such a gateway is detected.

Talk group ‘USA 1776’ could add to the appeal of DMR. It’s unclear on which network this talk group will reside, but my best guess is that it will be the Motorola network.  MITCON writes:

The “USA 1776″ (English preferred) Talk Group will be distributed worldwide to DMR networks upon request.  The spirit of “1776” is to continue the Amateur Radio tradition of international friendship and to push the boundaries of technology in the new frontier of digital communications.

USA 1776USA 1776 is intended to be a flexible, politically neutral, unrestricted Talk Group that can be used as Push-To-Talk (PTT) or Full-Time (FT) to meet the operating requirements of a DMR Network.  DMR subscribers are welcome to use 1776 as a universal meeting place to “Rag Chew” or as a jumping off point and QSY to an alternative Talk Group if desired.  To add USA 1776 to your DMR Network please contact us to schedule a time for configuration & testing.

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9 comments on “‘USA 1776’ DMR Talk Group

  1. I don’t think (at least in the US) you can say “The Motorola network” anymore.. Which one? DMR-MARC, DCI or one of the many others? Some connect with each other, some don’t.

    • You’re right, things go fast – which will make it even more challenging to explain things to newcomers or answering questions like “why can’t I talk to on DMR?”

  2. Great, well let’s just kick the radio bit into touch and use SKPE, mobile phones, the Internet and just forget radio. Forget transmitter sites, SWL can hear stuff broadcast over the Internet.

    The whole fun part of setting up a system and seeing how far you get, or chinwagging on 2m/40m/80m, out the window. I mean I could talk to all of these people a whole lot easier on a good mobile phone tariff with conference call.

    • Pretty sure there’s room enough in the hobby for people who want to use the internet and people who don’t.

  3. >USA 1776 is intended to be a flexible, politically neutral,

    Politically neutral ?

    I don’t think the Brits would see USA and the numbers 1776 as being neutral.

    The reminder of a major part of their empire being lost with the help of French
    traitors might just be a bit inflammatory 😉

  4. Have you tried analog multisite network with RoIP gates connected to VHF/UHF radios? I know guys who had connected Krasnoyarsk, Novosibirsk and some small cities in Siberia together. I think that this experience can be extended to the whole world. Of course this solution no have groups and timeslots, but the equipment is cheaper.

  5. I’m still so new to Ham, I don’t know exactly what you’re talking about yet, but I’d like to understand. “Chance favors a prepared mind.” KD8OCU. 73’s

    On Mon, Mar 30, 2015 at 9:40 AM, Ham Radio Blog PD0AC wrote:

    > Hans PD0AC posted: “One of the nice things of D-Star and DMR is the > ability to talk all over the world without the need of an HF rig and a > bunch of big antennas. While this largely reduces a radio to a simple > Internet-driven communication tool – just like Skype or other VoIP” Respond > to this post by replying above this line > New post on *Ham Radio Blog PD0AC* > ‘USA 1776′ DMR > Talk Group > by Hans > PD0AC > > [image: DMR-logo] > One of the nice > things of D-Star and DMR is the ability to talk all over the world without > the need of an HF rig and a bunch of big antennas. While this largely > reduces a radio to a simple Internet-driven communication tool – just like > Skype or other VoIP apps – it’s definitely nice to use. > > There are a few problems surrounding DMR, one of which is the lack of more > than two time slots. For example, if hams are using the Dutch Hytera > network and occupying talk group 204 on slot 1, World Wide (which uses the > same time slot) will be unavailable. Because 204-1 is a busy place, world > wide QSOs are often impossible. It’s one of the reasons I thought of > dumping DMR all together — I can talk to the same Dutch guys on analog > while enjoying a much better quality audio. > > There are reasons to keep DMR too. DMR is maturing; there are more than > enough possibilities to put less pressure on the nation-wide network by > going local. Now if only hams would do that…. but most don’t. Another > reason to keep DMR for now is the gateway we recently added, which connects > D-Star to our DMR network. > > Not available on the Motorola network, sorry — some people responsible > for that network appear to be so scared of such innovations that they will > ban a repeater from the network if such a gateway is detected. > > Talk group ‘USA 1776’ could add to the appeal of DMR. It’s unclear on > which network this talk group will reside, but my best guess is that it > will be the Motorola network. MITC

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