Powerwerx DB-750X

Abort, Retry, Ignore? After the rather disappointing debute of the AT-5888, Anytone gives it another shot (thanks to Nate for all the info). Marketed under the name Powerwerx DB-750X this radio might (or might not) address the problems we encountered in the old model.

powdb750x

At just $299 the radio appears to be a good deal, but when I read the manual (download here) there’s a catch:

“This commercial mobile radio ships from the manufacture “Display Locked” per FCC rules. You must have the RPS-DB750X-USB programming kit to unlock this radio for the first time of use. If you do not want to purchase this optional software, your radio dealer must first unlock this radio before regular use.”

When reading this page (worth a click, specs are there too) this will set you back another $40. It might be worth it though: the software looks great.

powrpsdb750-softwareAfter checking some more details in the manual, there’s one thing they didn’t learn from past mistakes: there’s no N-connector on the back, but they used the infamous SO-239 again. You must be &+$*&%] kidding me. Why on earth would I want to connect an antenna with something which is basically a shielded banana plug?

Oh well, at least we get a colorful display with 7-character long alpha tags.

powdb750x-colors

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16 comments on “Powerwerx DB-750X

    • SO-239, which accepts the well known PL-259 plug, is usable up to 30 MHz or so. Beyond that you will experience losses and impedance problems.

      (There’s more to it than I write here, maybe worth an article later in time)

  1. 40 dollars to unlock “use” the radio? They must be begging to have that software pirated. Wonder why they just don’t bundle it in and raise the price? Though I guess if you’re buying more than one rig you save some cash.

    • No need to buy the cable/software or have the dealer unlock the radio, Just look in the manual for factory reset. Follow the instructions and the radio is unlock without spending the extra 40 bucks.

  2. I bet that worse things happen to RF paths INSIDE many radios than passing through an SO239/PL259 🙂
    I bet that you could change the socket in any radio you worry about, and not notice any practical difference whatsoever.
    I stand to be corrected, but that’s my hunch! I’ve always thought that this is the kind of folklore ‘wisdom’ that can be compared to urban myths in its ability to propagate.

  3. ahahaahha i’m smiling a lot!!! it’s ’cause me and some friends “hate” N due to some problem with soldering one (or two and more…) N on rg213 ond 58… my N on the roof go in short-circuit cause sliding isolation for hot and cold, and hot etc… :-)) so two days ago with answer ourselves “Why use N an not PL???” with know about losses and impedance, but it was chatting between “nerdies” :-ppp and now reading ’bout your PL avvertion, make me smile , so many different opinions sometimes :-))
    I’ve AT-5888 in car and it’s not so bad… if you DONT use mic ad audio… I use and external speaker… and many “digital beeeping disturbs” go away… but telling that’s a good radio… naaaaaaaaa……!!! but 250€ is betetr than ‘baut 400€!!!! for FT-8800, that I have in my house.. paid so cheap in a fari… I changed it with my old unused president lincoln and i added 100€…. GOOD JOB for the blog!!! I read daily!! (+ or -….) BYEZ

  4. “…there’s no N-connector on the back, but they used the infamous SO-239 again. You must be &+$*&%] kidding me. Why on earth would I want to connect an antenna with something which is basically a shielded banana plug?” – Because there are still numpties like me out here who find it a damn sight easier to solder a PL259 than an N, and we’re in the majority and they don’t want to p!55 off their potential customers. Next question. 😀

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