When Wireless Goes Rogue

Wireless Access Point
WiFi, who doesn’t use it? I do, but only to surf the WWW. Everything else is done using my old fashioned cabled network. There’s a reason for that: having been an editor for the Dutch PC Magazine for about 15 years, I know how easy it is to set up a rogue access point. In my case it is a FON router, and so far it proves to be quite easy to capture anyones account names and passwords. A rogue access point could be seen as a ‘honey pot‘. The idea of finding totally free Internet access makes people blind for the risks.

Now I’m not interested in someone else’s accounts and passwords at all, and I certainly don’t intend to sniff them out and abuse them, so I used my own laptop and access codes instead. After some experiments I’m pretty sure that I can intercept anyone’s private information who is stupid enough to trust my rogue access point.

More experiments will follow next week when, if everything works as well as we intended, PA2AYX and me will set up a long distance WiFi network. Now remember, this is just for fun, so the ‘Rogue Factor’ will be killed off faster than it took to set it up.

Interesting links:

Weather stations, car keys, car alarms and other funny stuff
Another example of wireless going rogue is the use of the 70cm band for weather stations or car keys and alarms. Weather stations aren’t very interesting. Yes, you could jam them, but nobody would probably notice. Car keys and alarms are a different story. Many car makers use 433.920MHz as the standard frequency to operate remote car keys and alarms, which is right in the middle of our amateur band. Not too smart, as it proves to be very easy to record the (AM modulated) signal, replay it, and watch doors open or close. Just a low power carrier is enough to ‘jam’ the doors, or prevent owners to switch on their alarm system. A true haven for thieves.

There are plenty of other and more reliable frequencies to choose from, but the low price of standard 70cm devices seems to be more important. A real shame.

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4 comments on “When Wireless Goes Rogue

  1. ( as it proves to be very easy to record the (AM modulated) signal, replay it, and watch doors open or close. Just a low power carrier is enough to ‘jam’ the doors, or prevent owners to switch on their alarm system. A true haven for thieves.) Heb je dit zelf geprobeerd Hans? Vandaag even een eperiment gedaan a la mythbusters. “Jammen” lukt wel. Maar opnemen van het signaal en dan weer afspelen om een deur te openen is mij nog niet gelukt. Misschien doe ik wat fout. Neem het op van 433.920 AM met een MP3 speler en speel het daarna af op 433.920 AM, maar er gebeurd niets helaas. Was wel leuk geweest als het wel werkte…..73, Bas

      • Wat ik ervan begrepen heb, is dat er een “sessie sleutel” (encryptie) gemaakt wordt, dat zou dus de opnemen en afspelen truuk tegen moeten gaan, het storen is natuurlijk niet moeilijk, dit is dan ook waar gebruik gemaakt wordt door de misdaad sector….
        Misschien is er iets met je auto Hans ? misschien ff laten checken door de dealer..

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